Happy for No Reason

Almost a year ago, I had the opportunity to attend the eWomenNetwork conference in Dallas. It was a phenomenal event that sent me soaring into the clouds. I was able to hold on to that for a bit. As you can imagine, the high eventually deflated a bit and “normal” returned. Opened a new business and got new furniture. Things are up again. Then they level out. Got a big contract and was elated. I am again leveling back out.

Don’t get me wrong. I am very appreciative of my journey. And I understand that we don’t live our entire lives in the clouds. I am betting we wouldn’t want to even if we could. I also enjoy the levelness. What I don’t like is the height of the levelness. I think that the steady path where we spend most of our lives can be more enjoyable. I think the sound of the word “normal” should provoke a little more happiness.

While in Dallas, I picked up the Happy for No Reason course from Marci Shimoff. I had the opportunity to hear her speak and it really resonated with me. Of course, when I got home, things were so over whelming and disjointed. I attempted to apply the course to my schedule. I didn’t.

Earlier this week, I remembered something Marci had talked about – the “happiness set point.” The general concept is that our happiness is sorta like our body temperature – it has a “normal.” Some folks have a higher or lower “normal” and the temperature can always be changed by external circumstances.

The interesting thing is that a study found that the set point was only 50% genetic. What I am now interested in is the other 50%.

Not sure how much of this I will blog about in the upcoming weeks as I am not sure how personal it gets. But, I will keep you posted on what I can and would love to hear your feedback on the topic.

Comments

  1. Abraham Lincoln said “Most people are about as happy as they make up their minds to be”. Ill check out the links, thanks

    Ned Carey

  2. An interesting perspective on happiness. Never thought of it like a body temperature. I’m going to play with this method too and see how it makes me feel.

  3. That other 50% takes a bit of work I fear. It’s all a journey. Marci put a lot of work into the ideas in her book. I was with her the day it launched and the energy around it was amazing. It sparked discussion which is what we need- especially about being happy and human in the workplace.

    Glad to have found your blog. We’re aligned in many ways. Hope to connect in the future! Best, Judy

  4. That other 50% takes a bit of work I fear. It’s all a journey. Marci put a lot of work into the ideas in her book. I was with her the day it launched and the energy around it was amazing. It sparked discussion which is what we need- especially about being happy and human in the workplace.

    Glad to have found your blog. We’re aligned in many ways. Hope to connect in the future! Please come visit at http://www.worklifenation.com

    Best, Judy

  5. Ned,

    I think Abe may be on to something, don’tcha think 😉

  6. Karl,

    Honestly, I didn’t either until I wrote it. Still chewing on the best visualization to make it all come together.

    Please keep me posted with what you come up with.

  7. Judy,

    The work part is what I remember most about Marci’s talk. It was eye opening to hear her talk about her own struggels and the differences in set points between her and her father. The thing I took away from it was that regardless of where you were, the end result is attainable. As long as I know a goal is reachable, the work doesn’t seem so daunting.

    Wasn’t able to spend much time at your place, but I read the Twitter post. It was phenomenal! Can’t wait to read more.

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